31 Comments

  1. This is a very nice photo, and it’s well-suited for the ‘layers’ challenge. Great submission!

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  2. Thank you to all who have taken the time to comment. It was truly a haunting view considering the destructiveness of the fire. Over 250 homes were destroyed. It was the most destructive fire in the state’s history. But it did provide many interesting and fascinating photo ops.

    Galen

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  3. Today I read another piece about wildfires. I realised the purging, cleansing action of fire. They cause havoc and dismay but the earth needs them. This image is a beauty, i would have thought it mist if you had’nt written otherwise.

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    1. You are absolutely correct. That is why most wildland fires that are naturally caused (lightening) and do not threaten homes are watched but not suppressed. For pine trees to reproduce… the seeds in the pine cones have to be expelled… and that can only happen through fire. It’s also important the old dead underbrush in a forest be cleared… and that also happens through fire. I guess the problem (or at least what we see as a problem) is that we are not on the same time table as the forest. Full replenishment can take longer than a life time. And we tend to want immediate results. Also… so many people are building and living in forest areas that once were open. That means more homes are threatened by forest fires than ever before… and that means “put the fire out!” The days of letting a wildland fire do its job to clear and replenish the forest are gradually coming to a sad halt.

      Always thankful for your comments…

      Galen

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